Martha Morgan, Esq.

Board Member

Martha Morgan, is a native of Luverne, Alabama. She is Professor Emerita of Law at the University of Alabama School of Law and is a faculty member of the Women's Human Rights Education Institute at the University of Toronto. In 1968, over twenty years after the U. S.  Supreme Court’s decision in Brown v Bd, Of Educ. (1954), she graduated from the still largely segregated Luverne High School. She has a B.S. from the University of Alabama and a J.D. from George Washington University.  She was a Kellogg Foundation National Fellow from 1985-88. In addition to her teaching and research activities, Professor Morgan continues to work on matters related to public education and civil rights, having served as an attorney for plaintiff schoolchildren in the desegregation case of Lee v. Macon County (Pickens County) and working on state constitutional revision issues related to equality and public education. She also serves as co-counsel in a racial profiling and debtor’s prison case against the City of Montgomery.

 

Now retired from full-time law teaching, she is able to devote even more of her time to serving as an activist for equality, peace, and social justice at  home in Alabama and abroad. She serves as a resource person and trainer on CEDAW (the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women) for the International Women’s Rights Action Watch Asia Pacific. She is a member of the board of directors of the Equal Justice Initiative and serves on the Steering Committee for SOS (Saving Ourselves Movement for Justice and Democracy). She is the Vice-Chair of the Board of the Selma Center for Nonviolence and a Level 1 Kingian Nonviolence Trainer.Martha Morgan, is a native of Luverne, Alabama. She is Professor Emerita of Law at the University of Alabama School of Law and is a faculty member of the Women's Human Rights Education Institute at the University of Toronto. In 1968, over twenty years after the U. S.  Supreme Court’s decision in Brown v Bd, Of Educ. (1954), she graduated from the still largely segregated Luverne High School. She has a B.S. from the University of Alabama and a J.D. from George Washington University.  She was a Kellogg Foundation National Fellow from 1985-88. In addition to her teaching and research activities, Professor Morgan continues to work on matters related to public education and civil rights, having served as an attorney for plaintiff schoolchildren in the desegregation case of Lee v. Macon County (Pickens County) and working on state constitutional revision issues related to equality and public education. She also serves as co-counsel in a racial profiling and debtor’s prison case against the City of Montgomery.

 

Now retired from full-time law teaching, she is able to devote even more of her time to serving as an activist for equality, peace, and social justice at  home in Alabama and abroad. She serves as a resource person and trainer on CEDAW (the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women) for the International Women’s Rights Action Watch Asia Pacific. She is a member of the board of directors of the Equal Justice Initiative and serves on the Steering Committee for SOS (Saving Ourselves Movement for Justice and Democracy). She is the Vice-Chair of the Board of the Selma Center for Nonviolence and a Level 1 Kingian Nonviolence Trainer.

Martha Morgan, is a native of Luverne, Alabama. She is Professor Emerita of Law at the University of Alabama School of Law and is a faculty member of the Women's Human Rights Education Institute at the University of Toronto. In 1968, over twenty years after the U. S.  Supreme Court’s decision in Brown v Bd, Of Educ. (1954), she graduated from the still largely segregated Luverne High School. She has a B.S. from the University of Alabama and a J.D. from George Washington University.  She was a Kellogg Foundation National Fellow from 1985-88. In addition to her teaching and research activities, Professor Morgan continues to work on matters related to public education and civil rights, having served as an attorney for plaintiff schoolchildren in the desegregation case of Lee v. Macon County (Pickens County) and working on state constitutional revision issues related to equality and public education. She also serves as co-counsel in a racial profiling and debtor’s prison case against the City of Montgomery.

 

Now retired from full-time law teaching, she is able to devote even more of her time to serving as an activist for equality, peace, and social justice at  home in Alabama and abroad. She serves as a resource person and trainer on CEDAW (the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women) for the International Women’s Rights Action Watch Asia Pacific. She is a member of the board of directors of the Equal Justice Initiative and serves on the Steering Committee for SOS (Saving Ourselves Movement for Justice and Democracy). She is the Vice-Chair of the Board of the Selma Center for Nonviolence and a Level 1 Kingian Nonviolence Trainer.Martha Morgan, is a native of Luverne, Alabama. She is Professor Emerita of Law at the University of Alabama School of Law and is a faculty member of the Women's Human Rights Education Institute at the University of Toronto. In 1968, over twenty years after the U. S.  Supreme Court’s decision in Brown v Bd, Of Educ. (1954), she graduated from the still largely segregated Luverne High School. She has a B.S. from the University of Alabama and a J.D. from George Washington University.  She was a Kellogg Foundation National Fellow from 1985-88. In addition to her teaching and research activities, Professor Morgan continues to work on matters related to public education and civil rights, having served as an attorney for plaintiff schoolchildren in the desegregation case of Lee v. Macon County (Pickens County) and working on state constitutional revision issues related to equality and public education. She also serves as co-counsel in a racial profiling and debtor’s prison case against the City of Montgomery.

 

Now retired from full-time law teaching, she is able to devote even more of her time to serving as an activist for equality, peace, and social justice at  home in Alabama and abroad. She serves as a resource person and trainer on CEDAW (the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women) for the International Women’s Rights Action Watch Asia Pacific. She is a member of the board of directors of the Equal Justice Initiative and serves on the Steering Committee for SOS (Saving Ourselves Movement for Justice and Democracy). She is the Vice-Chair of the Board of the Selma Center for Nonviolence and a Level 1 Kingian Nonviolence Trainer.

 

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